Another Handful of Links

19 Nov

I posted a link roundup on Friday, but I have a few more I’d like to add.

What Ratzan does is illustrate how Junie B. Jones exemplifies four properties of language: (1) Language follows rules; (2) Language is constantly changing; (3) Language is learned at special times and in special ways; and (4) Language is a reflection of social power.  Using examples from the books, she demonstrates how Junie B.’s s0-called sloppy grammar is actually quite smart and astute for a child of her age and experience.

The article made me realize that Barbara Park was a freaking genius.  She created a voice for Junie that rang authentic to her readers, and Junie’s hilarious misuse of the English language was an ongoing joke between those readers and Barbara Park.  No wonder kids love those books so much, and will continue to do so for a long time to come.

  • Back in September, I posted a link to a shirt.woot tee inspired by Ylvis’ YouTube smash hit, “What Does the Fox Say?” (230 million views and counting).  I proposed the shirt be adopted as the official storytime uniform of 2013.  After all, we can all name books where we’re reading along, making the appropriate animal sounds, and then we turn the page and there’s an animal for which we have to admit to our  audiences, “I have no clue what they sound like.”
I keep meaning to ask the good people at shirt.woot for royalties.  By far, there have been more clicks on this link than any other on my young blog.

I keep meaning to ask the good people at shirt.woot for royalties.  There have been more clicks on this link than any other on ‘Z Before Y’.  By far.

What Does the Fox SaySimon & Schuster has put two and two together and inked a deal with the Norwegian group to turn “What Does the Fox Say?” into a children’s book, which will be released here in the U.S. on December 10th.  Some background on the song: Ylvis recorded it at Jay Z’s Roc the Mic studio here in New York kind of as a lark.  Their mission, they say, was to produce the stupidest song on the most expensive equipment in the history of the music industry.  It appears they are taking the book more seriously.  Says Vergard Ylvisaker, one half of Ylyvis:

“[the book is]…much more than just a spin-off from the video. We actually started the process with the illustrator before we even uploaded the video to YouTube. As we were working with the song it just felt like it had the potential of becoming an interesting book as well, mostly because all of a sudden we found ourselves wondering what does the fox really say?” (source: The Guardian)

Maybe in Norway animals make ding-a-ring-ding sounds when no one is around to hear them.  But here in the U.S., the frogs, owls, bears, and turtles seem to prefer either some variation on, “La-la-la-la-la” or Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle catchphrases.  Jbrary (whose new website looks terrific!) is one of my go-to resources when I need new storytime material.  Here are Lindsey and Dana doing a widely-loved storytime song, “Mmm, Ahh Went the Little Green Frog”, complete with jazz hands:

Then they offer a variation with a brown bear and a turtle who says, “Cowabunga, Dude!”

And then they give us a version for fall storytimes with verses about a Little Brown Owl and a Little Red Squirrel.  Full disclosure: I am responsible for bringing the owl song to their attention, but the ingenious addition of the little red squirrel verse is 100% Jbrary.

Thanks for reading, everyone.  Enjoy the rest of the week!

~Catherine

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2 Responses to “Another Handful of Links”

  1. Rakisha Kearns-White November 19, 2013 at 10:33 am #

    So many times i’ve gotten to an animal and I have no idea what it says or if it even makes a sound. That’s when I look up imploringly at the parents and the children, and I get a loud kooky sound from one imaginative tot. Thank goodness for assertive kids.

    • zbeforey November 19, 2013 at 1:50 pm #

      That’s true, Rakisha. You can invite the kids to use their imaginations and share sounds they think those animals make!

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