Wake Up, Kitty Cats, and Look at Some Links

15 Nov
Ya-ww-n!  This is one lynx who is ready for some links (photo source: wallpaperswa.com)

Str-e-tch!  This lynx is clearly ready for some hot links (photo source: wallpaperswa.com)

Hullo!  I’ve been dumping articles and and addresses into WordPress for a couple of weeks, and now I will share the bounty with all of you.  Happy scrolling!

  • I am hardly a snappy dresser.  All of my clothes are black, gray, and blue, and I own very little in terms of jewelry and accessories.  I never even got my ears pierced, for pete’s sake.  Show me a Tumblr of outfits inspired by Nancy Drew, though, and suddenly I am looking online for a cute cloche.  These outfits aren’t directly inspired by the Nancy Drew books, by the way, but by a series of Nancy online games produced by HeR Interactive.  No matter.  They look like something Nancy would wear on the covers of the original books from the 1930’s, the ones with the yellow spines.  (via Buzzfeed)
Nancy Drew Outfit

Outfit inspired by a Nancy Drew online game, ‘Message in a Haunted Mansion.’ Look at those cute oxfords!

  • This one is from a couple of months ago.  The always eccentric Lemony Snicket was a guest-judge on an episode of Top Chefs Masters on Bravo.  In his 12-minute appearance, he serenaded the celebrity chef contestants with his accordion, shared with the audience that his nickname in high school was Blood Turnip, and made florid, over-the-top pronouncements on the dishes he sampled.  Frankly, the chefs and the host looked irritated with him, and thought he was a bit of a whack-a-doodle.  They obviously can’t appreciate him like we do, right?  Judge for yourself, you’ll find the video at this link.  Mr. Snicket’s segment is the first one after the opening credits.
  • Picture Book MonthNovember is Picture Book Month! As its website states, “Picture Book Month is an international literacy initiative that celebrates the print picture book during the month of November”.  Every day they publish a short essay from an author, illustrator, educator, and picture book enthusiast on why picture books are important.  We are halfway through the month, and we have already been treated to posts from the likes of Tomie dePaola, Rosemary Wells, and Laura Vaccaro Seeger.  Looking through the site has certainly motivated me to join the celebration and shine a spotlight on picture books at my library before the end of November.  Illustrator Katie Davis, a Picture Book Month co-founder, gives us this lovely video of authors and illustrators answering the question, “What is a picture book?”

  • I’m still milking my success with all things Yoda.  First on the docket, a mashup of Dr. Seuss and Star Wars.  (via Affectdad)

Yoda SeussThen, although it has nothing to do with children’s books or libraries, I submit for your viewing pleasure a photo of a pig with an image of Yoda on its forehead. (via Richard Wiseman).

Yoda Pig

I’m a vegetarian, so jokes about Dagoban ham and bacon, I WILL NOT MAKE.

Image Source: Tiny Tips for Library Fun

Image Source: Tiny Tips for Library Fun

  • I don’t order books anymore.  My library system does centralized ordering for its branches, and only the divisions of our Central Library do their own ordering.  I don’t miss it (yet), and I am mostly satisfied with how responsive our collection is to our patrons (although I have not seen a single copy of Rick Riordan or any title from the  Diary of a Wimpy Kid oeuvre in the 3 1/2 weeks since I started at my new branch).   When I was in charge of purchasing children’s books for the Central Library, I came up with all sorts of rules, systems, and axioms for getting the most bang out of our book budget buck.  Thanks to Marge at Tiny Tips for Library Fun, I don’t need to type them out here.  She lays out her top poor selection practices in two installments of, “Top 12 Ways to Be a BAD Selector” (post 1 and post 2).  I am not 100% in following Marge’s words of wisdom, however.  I’ll own up to not weeding books by Canadian writer Brian Doyle for the longest time because I loved them, even though it was clear Brooklyn’s young readers could care less.  That’s a flagrant violation of Rule #8.
  • Cover Grimms MarchenLast year, Philip Pullman published an English translation of Grimm’s Fairy Tales.  Now there is a German edition that has translated Pullman’s English translation back into German (stay with me) and it has been illustrated with sculptures by Shaun Tan.  You don’t need to know a lick of German to recognize how fittingly Tan’s use of basic elements (sand, metal, clay) represents the dreamlike and emotionally charged strangeness of these classic stories.  Take a look. (via Educating Alice)
Hansel and Gretel

“Hansel and Gretel”

"The Fisherman's Wife"

“The Fisherman’s Wife”

  • Warby Parker, purveyors of those librarian-chic eyeglasses that all cost just 95 bucks, gives us this handy chart of Reading Positions.  I can vouch that The Inchworm (fig. 7), is pretty darn comfy, while The Modified Beyoncé (fig. 10) gives burying one’s nose in a book a certain dramatic flair.  (via Swiss Miss)
  • Warby Parker
    tree octopus

    Taking a trip to the Pacific Northwest? Don’t forget your tree octopus repellent.

    A ‘Z BeforeY’ post is incomplete unless I link to my dearest of colleagues, Ingrid.  Check out this post in which she tackles an all-too-common presumption: that kids and teens are naturals at sniffing out inaccurate, biased, or sloppy information when they search online.  Not so.  The internet may have been around since before they were born, but they are not being taught to scrutinize the integrity of the information they encounter online (And I mean that as a sweeping generalization.  I know there are communities that offer rigorous information literacy training to their students, but those are too few and too far in between).   Ingrid’s post provides some excellent resources ( The ‘Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus’ has long been my favorite hoax site) AND she blows the cover off the great Brooklyn Public Library/Disappearance of Agatha Ann Cunningham Mystery.  Folks, it was all made up.  It never happened.  It sure fooled a lot of people, though.  Heh, heh, heh.

  • I’m going to wrap up with a book trailer for a new title that boasts a SQUEEEE! Factor that is off the charts.  It is Newborn Puppies: Dogs in Their First Three Weeks by Traer Scott.  Mr. Schu included it in a roundup of titles for holiday giving.  If you can make it through the video below WITHOUT bellowing out some iteration of, ‘Awwww!’ or ‘PUH-PEEES!’, you are a much less of a mush than yours truly.

All together, now.  PUH-PEEEEES!!!!!

                                                                                    ~Catherine

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2 Responses to “Wake Up, Kitty Cats, and Look at Some Links”

  1. Wake Up Now Scam November 30, 2013 at 8:49 am #

    Verry goo article. I think its verry helpfull for us. So i share this with my friend. thank u.

    • zbeforey December 2, 2013 at 8:33 pm #

      Thank you for taking the time to write!

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